Section 6, Resource Development, Chapter 18 (Resource Providers Approved to Provide Elevated Needs Foster Care Services) Subsection 2 Elevated Needs Level A, – Sub-subsection 3 (Characteristics of a Youth with Elevated Needs- Level A)

Section 6, Resource Development, Chapter 18 (Resource Providers Approved to Provide Elevated Needs Foster Care Services) Subsection 2 Elevated Needs Level A, – Sub-subsection 3 (Characteristics of a Youth with Elevated Needs- Level A)

18.2.3   Characteristics of a Youth with Elevated Needs-Level A

An approved Level A Resource Provider must be able to identify and have the skill set to handle effectively a youth identified has needing elevated needs level A foster care services. Youth with elevated needs require greater structure, supervision, and are less able to assume responsibility for their daily care. These youth have typically experienced multiple out-of-home placements.

Youth appropriate for Level A fall into one of two categories:

  1. Youth presently in a residential setting who may be moved to a less intensive setting, but not to a traditional resource home or to their parents’ home; or
  2. Youth who lack a viable placement in a traditional resource home and because of their presenting problems would be placed in a residential setting unless an available Level A resource home can be found.

Presenting problems displayed by the foster youth identified as needing Level A foster care services may include the following:

  • Behaviors which if not modified could result in the youth being designated as a status offender;
  • History of irresponsible or inappropriate sexual behavior, which has resulted in the need for extraordinary supervision;
  • Threatening, intimidating, or destructive behavior which is demonstrated by multiple incidents over a period of time;
  • Problems of defiance when dealing with authority figures;
  • Significant problems with peer relations;
  • Significant problems at school that affect academic achievement or social adjustment;
  • Significant problems with lying, stealing, or manipulating;
  • Significant problems of temper control;
  • Mild substance abuse related problems;
  • Oppositional behavior which contributes to placement disruptions and inability to function productively with peers, parent figures, birth family, etc.;
  • Any of above behaviors, coupled with medical problems; or
  • Any of above behaviors displayed by one or more youth of a sibling group, qualifying the entire sibling group for placement together, if appropriate. However, not all youth would be eligible for the Level A maintenance rate.

Presenting Problems Displayed by the Youth with Elevated Needs–Level A

Presenting problems displayed by the Level A candidate may include the following:

  • Behaviors which if not modified could result in the youth being designated as a status offender;
  • History of irresponsible or inappropriate sexual behavior, which has resulted in the need for extraordinary supervision;
  • Threatening, intimidating, or destructive behavior which is demonstrated by multiple incidents over a period of time;
  • Problems of defiance when dealing with authority figures;
  • Significant problems with peer relations;
  • Significant problems at school that affect academic achievement or social adjustment;
  • Significant problems with lying, stealing, or manipulating;
  • Significant problems of temper control;
  • Mild substance abuse related problems;
  • Oppositional behavior which contributes to placement disruptions and inability to function productively with peers, parent figures, birth family, etc.;
  • Any of above behaviors, coupled with medical problems; or
  • Any of above behaviors displayed by one or more youth of a sibling group, qualifying the entire sibling group for placement together, if appropriate. However, not all youth would be eligible for the Level A maintenance rate.

 Youth Who May Not be Appropriate for Level A

Youth who may not be appropriate for Level A include:

  • Youth under the age of three (3) who cannot be treated effectively through the behavior modification treatment model;
  • Youth who exhibit severe psychiatric behavior, as diagnosed by a psychiatrist/psychologist, such as an obvious lack of emotional contact, affect disturbances, and/or severe thought distortions;
  • Youth with a recent history of extreme or dangerous physical aggression;
  • Youth with a recent history of fire setting;
  • Youth who have recently attempted suicide and continue to have suicidal ideations;
  • Youth with an IQ below 65(should also look at functioning);
  • Youth who are medically diagnosed as chemically dependent and whether they have had treatment;
  • Youth with severe medical or physical handicaps which present barriers that the child cannot or will not overcome;
  • Youth whose primary presenting problem, as diagnosed by a psychiatrist/psychologist is sexual addiction and who need extremely structured treatment and unusually close supervision; or
  • Youth with personality disorders, as diagnosed by a psychiatrist/psychologist, who have severe problems forming attachments with caretakers and significant others.

Chapter Memoranda History: (prior to 01-31-07)

CS03-21, CS03-27, CD05-72

Memoranda History:

CD10-08